Sarah Palin Thinks Paul Ryan’s Budget Is A “Joke” Because It’s Not Extreme Enough

Sarah Palin makes empty criticisms of Paul Ryan's budget plan.

Without telling anyone what a suitable alternative would be, half term Governor Sarah Palin criticizes Paul Ryan’s budget plan. Image Credit: Salon

Paul Ryan’s budget plan makes no sense to any rational person.

Paul Ryan logic: even though taking from the poor and giving to the rich didn’t work, we need to make every year’s budget just that. The plan Congressman Ryan has regurgitated to the American people since 2012 would essentially slash over $5 trillion in federal spending over a decade with the intent to balance the government’s budget through deep running cuts in programs like food stamps and government-paid health care for the poor and working class. Along with the slashing of food for low income children, the plan would also cut Pell Grants for low-income students and pensions for many federal workers (they obviously learned nothing from last October’s shutdown).

Military spending in the budget through 2024 would actually rise by $483 billion over the spending caps established in the 2011 Budget Control Act, and it would call for a complete repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Even with only some of the major devastation Ryan’s budget would do to the middle class, the economy, and the government is listed, there are some who think it just doesn’t go far enough. Enter Sarah Palin.

Sarah Palin’s reasons for hating the plan are completely misguided.

Palin took to her Facebook to denounce the Ryan budget as, surprisingly, a “joke.” But the reasons why won’t shock anyone who has had the displeasure of listening to her mindless drivel for the last six years.

“The latest Ryan (R, Wisconsin) Budget is not an April Fool’s joke. But it really IS a joke because it is STILL not seeing the problem; it STILL is not proposing reining in wasteful government overspending TODAY, instead of speculating years out that some future Congress and White House may possibly, hopefully, eh-who-knows, take responsibility for today’s budgetary selfishness and shortsightedness to do so.”

In other words: we are not taking enough from the middle class, hungry children on food stamps, the elderly, low income students, and anyone who has a pulse. Paul Ryan no longer takes the prize for biggest austerity-promoting politician. That award now goes to Mrs. Palin.

Paul Ryan was very uppity on “Fox and Friends” yesterday when toting that “This [the budget] cuts more spending than any other budget I’ve ever written.” But apparently this is the “definition of insanity” to Palin.

It appears that Mrs. Palin only speaks in headlines and only addresses outcomes instead of offering real solutions to our nation’s problems. When one reveals too many details, you actually have to be held accountable. That might be why Palin can only deliver the same anti-welfare rhetoric mixed with March Madness blabber, but not deliver on how to balance an actual budget.

Republicans initially reflexively defended Ryan’s budget until Palin told them what to think, and showed them examples of her grand budgetary plans (spoiler: there are none). Now, not so much.

Anyone, from the nation’s top economists, to The New York Times editorial board might disagree with Palin, however. The budget lowers the top tax rate to 25 percent for the wealthiest taxpayers, down from the current 39.6 percent, while raising taxes on middle-class families with children by an average of $2,000. Reform the tax code. There would be two categories, 10 and 25 percent. Corporate tax too would go from 36 to 25 percent.When Republican tax writers in the House tried to do something similar, they discovered it could not be done without huge increases in the deficit and mass outrage from the public. But that isn’t a problem for Mr. Ryan, and Mrs. Palin doesn’t even realize it. That is the scary reality.

Sarah Palin, to an extent, is right. This budget is a joke. But the  rest of like-minded America will overwhelmingly disagree with Palin as to why.