Family Of Man Shot And Killed By TX Deputy Is Sued For Deputy’s Pain And Suffering

911 calls usually imply danger. And a deputy suing a caller for danger he confronted is bad enough, but for PAST medical expenses, mental anguish, etc.? Image @ TheRawStory

911 calls usually imply danger. And a deputy suing a caller for danger he confronted is bad enough, but for PAST medical expenses, mental anguish, etc.? Image @ TheRawStory

If you live in Texas, the next time you call 911 you may want to make clear whether or not the situation is dangerous.

The family of a man killed by sheriff’s deputies after his mother-in-law called 911 back in December is being sued by one of the responding deputies, Brady Pullen. Pullen claims that the woman who called 911, Camina Figueroa, didn’t warn the emergency responders that her son-in-law, Kemel Yazar, was a “violent threat.”

Figueroa called 911 to get help with that same son-in-law, who was acting erratically after allegedly taking a substance that caused irrational behavior. When the deputies responded, one of whom was Pullen, they claim they were attacked right away, and had to taze Yazar and then shoot him. He was killed on the scene, and Pullen, who suffered some injuries in the incident, was taken to a local hospital. Pullen was treated for some cuts, a concussion and a bite.

But an eyewitness to the event, Corina Padilla, claims that Yazar never attacked the deputies and was unjustly killed.

Pullen’s lawsuit seeks $200,000 in damages from Figueroa, claiming that she didn’t “adequately warn others that her resident or guest Kemal Yazar posed a violent threat to others.” The suit also claims that Yazar was suffering the effects of a days-long binge on bath salts, and that Figueroa knew her son-in-law was dangerous as she removed the children from the house to protect them. For failing to make clear the danger of the situation, Pullen wants damages to cover medical expenses, past and future, as well as:

“Past and future mental anguish, physical disfigurement and impairment, future and past pain and suffering, and loss of earning capacity.”

There are few people who would argue that law enforcement personnel don’t put themselves in harm’s way every time they answer a 911 call. In fact, that is the “understood risk,” which is why the lawsuit is likely to fail. But the precedent set by the mere filing of such a suit is just as dangerous. Whether the lawsuit is successful or not, the legend of the officer that sued someone who asked for help just  may give people pause before calling 911 in the future.

The lesson here may be “Don’t Mess With Texas Deputies–They’ll Sue.”